@Regranned from @thedayafter2016 - Not so long ago: Samuel J. Battle was born Jan. 16, 1883 in New Bern, North Carolina. At the time he was recorded as the largest baby born in North Carolina at 16 pounds. Battle later grew to be 6’3’’ and over 280 pounds. When Battle was teenager, he was caught stealing money from a safe. His boss did not press charges but predicted Battle would be in prison within a year. Battle was determined to prove his boss wrong. He moved to New York City in 1901 and worked as a houseboy and red cap at the Sagamore Hotel. He decided to become a police officer since the job offered the stability he needed to support his young family. Battle became the first Black police officer in the New York Police Department. He ranked 119th out of 638 on his police test and officially joined the force June 1911 at the age of 28. Battle was initially assigned to the San Juan Hill neighborhood which was the heart of Black New York. With the great migration of the World War I period, he was reassigned to Harlem which became the center of Black life in the city. Battle became the first black sergeant, the first black lieutenant, and the first black parole commissioner. He endured discrimination and mistreatment while on the force from white civilians who traveled to Harlem to watch him work, as well as from white officers who refused to speak to him. However, some of the officers soon realized that Battle would be an asset in patrolling the Harlem community. In 1943 during the Harlem Riot, Battle was called by New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia to help defuse tensions in the community. Samuel Battle retired from the New York City Police Force in 1951 at 68. He was the highest-ranking Black officer on the force at that time. He died August 7, 1966 at age 83. In 2009 the corner of West 135th Street and Lenox Avenue in New York was renamed Samuel J. Battle Plaza in honor of his achievements. That street corner marked the location where Battle saved a white officer’s life during a racial skirmish in 1919. #samueljbattle #blackpoliceofficer #nypd #newyork #harlem #harlemriots #samueljbattleplaza #Notsolongago #nsla - #regrann
18
4 hours ago
Not so long ago: Samuel J. Battle was born Jan. 16, 1883 in New Bern, North Carolina. At the time he was recorded as the largest baby born in North Carolina at 16 pounds. Battle later grew to be 6’3’’ and over 280 pounds. When Battle was teenager, he was caught stealing money from a safe. His boss did not press charges but predicted Battle would be in prison within a year. Battle was determined to prove his boss wrong. He moved to New York City in 1901 and worked as a houseboy and red cap at the Sagamore Hotel. He decided to become a police officer since the job offered the stability he needed to support his young family. Battle became the first Black police officer in the New York Police Department. He ranked 119th out of 638 on his police test and officially joined the force June 1911 at the age of 28. Battle was initially assigned to the San Juan Hill neighborhood which was the heart of Black New York. With the great migration of the World War I period, he was reassigned to Harlem which became the center of Black life in the city. Battle became the first black sergeant, the first black lieutenant, and the first black parole commissioner. He endured discrimination and mistreatment while on the force from white civilians who traveled to Harlem to watch him work, as well as from white officers who refused to speak to him. However, some of the officers soon realized that Battle would be an asset in patrolling the Harlem community. In 1943 during the Harlem Riot, Battle was called by New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia to help defuse tensions in the community. Samuel Battle retired from the New York City Police Force in 1951 at 68. He was the highest-ranking Black officer on the force at that time. He died August 7, 1966 at age 83. In 2009 the corner of West 135th Street and Lenox Avenue in New York was renamed Samuel J. Battle Plaza in honor of his achievements. That street corner marked the location where Battle saved a white officer’s life during a racial skirmish in 1919. #samueljbattle #blackpoliceofficer #nypd #newyork #harlem #harlemriots #samueljbattleplaza #Notsolongago #nsla
47
5 hours ago
Everytime I look at this picture, I can't help but think of @thefareastartstudio posts. Do you think the same 😉 . PC @gem_ayesha #notsolongago #diwaliatoffice #saree #womeninsaree #colorful #vibrant #100sareepact #newsaree #patola #kanjivaram #sareesofinstagram #sareegram #sari #swag #posers #shotononeplus #portrait #flashback #friday
109
13 hours ago
#Repost @thedayafter2016 (@get_repost) ・・・ Not so long ago: Between 1940 and 1970 a mass migration brought thousands of Southern Black people to Chicago. Many settled in North Lawndale a middle class neighborhood on Chicago’s Westside. Federal policies known as redlining prevented Black families from getting real mortgages so they were forced to buy houses on contract from real estate speculators. The contracts were a scam. In 1968 the North Lawndale residents fought back with the help of community organizer Jack McNamara. McNamara discovered that the average overcharge was $10,000 per family. He also computed the monthly payments revealing that Blacks were paying a “race tax” of about $20,000 per family, a clear example of institutional racism. He later compiled data and estimated that more than $500 million ($3 Billion today) was legally stolen from Chicago's Black families between 1940 and 1970. With McNamara’s help, the people of North Lawndale organized the Contract Buyers League (CBL) and the Payment Strike of 1969 urging contract buyers to hold payments. By withholding payments the CBL was able to renegotiate, enabling the buyer to build equity and save on average $10,000 per contract. Mass evictions resulted. There were 552 families involved in the strike but after a long struggle it ended. Out of the 552 families only 106 successfully renegotiated their contracts while most lost and/or moved out of their homes. The CBL, hoping to set a nationwide precedent for fair housing, filed two federal lawsuits claiming discrimination; they lost both. Today North Lawndale is one of Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods with an unemployment rate over 18%; 42% of its residents live below the poverty line; and 1 in 5 homes is vacant. Fifty-one years ago Martin Luther King, Jr. moved into a dilapidated building in North Lawndale. Almost all the residents were impoverished and Black. Half a century later, they still are. #northlawndale #chicago #acaseforreparations #tanehisicoates #contractbuyersleague #cbl #redlining #racetax #paymentstrikeof1969 #jackmcnamara #martinlutherkingjr #notsolongago #nsla
8
13 hours ago
Fatalist attraction, yeah we might just end up crashing, but I’m ready if it happens with you @dualipa #tbt #notsolongago #stillinlove #nyc
33
20 hours ago
#Repost @thedayafter2016 (@get_repost) ・・・ Not so long ago: Born into slavery in Columbus County, North Carolina in 1851, Millie and Christine McCoy were the daughters of slaves owned by a blacksmith. Conjoined at birth, Millie and Christine were connected at the lower spine and shared one pelvis. At just 3-years-old, they became a featured attraction in P.T. Barnum’s American Museum in New York. A showman who worked there kidnapped them and shipped them to England where they toured between 1854 and 1855. While there, they were subjected to embarrassing public examinations in order to prove they were truly joined. This invasion of their privacy continued until they reached their teen years. By the time they were four, they had been stolen from their parents, kidnapped once and sold three times becoming lucrative earners for their succession of owners to exhibit in side-shows. Freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the girls remained with their last owner, J.P Smith, who had bought them for $30,000. Under his care and management they continued their career. Mrs. Smith taught them to read and write and honed their musical talents. They eventually became renowned performers touring the world as accomplished singers, pianists and even dancers. Fluent in five languages they danced and sang before the royal courts of Europe. They were a favorite of Queen Victoria. The twins soon earned enough money to support the rest of the family and for their father to purchase a farm. Returning to the States in 1882, they travelled with a circus for several years, receiving $25,000 a season, an extraordinary sum in those days. In 1884 they settled down in North Carolina, building a large house on the land they had bought for their father twenty years earlier. The twins succumbed to tuberculosis on October 8, 1912. Until their death they did charity work for Black schools and churches #millieandchristinemckoy #northcarolina #twins #cojoinedtwins #ptbarnum #Notsolongago #nsla
70
1 day ago
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