@Regranned from @thedayafter2016 - Not so long ago: Samuel J. Battle was born Jan. 16, 1883 in New Bern, North Carolina. At the time he was recorded as the largest baby born in North Carolina at 16 pounds. Battle later grew to be 6’3’’ and over 280 pounds. When Battle was teenager, he was caught stealing money from a safe. His boss did not press charges but predicted Battle would be in prison within a year. Battle was determined to prove his boss wrong. He moved to New York City in 1901 and worked as a houseboy and red cap at the Sagamore Hotel. He decided to become a police officer since the job offered the stability he needed to support his young family. Battle became the first Black police officer in the New York Police Department. He ranked 119th out of 638 on his police test and officially joined the force June 1911 at the age of 28. Battle was initially assigned to the San Juan Hill neighborhood which was the heart of Black New York. With the great migration of the World War I period, he was reassigned to Harlem which became the center of Black life in the city. Battle became the first black sergeant, the first black lieutenant, and the first black parole commissioner. He endured discrimination and mistreatment while on the force from white civilians who traveled to Harlem to watch him work, as well as from white officers who refused to speak to him. However, some of the officers soon realized that Battle would be an asset in patrolling the Harlem community. In 1943 during the Harlem Riot, Battle was called by New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia to help defuse tensions in the community. Samuel Battle retired from the New York City Police Force in 1951 at 68. He was the highest-ranking Black officer on the force at that time. He died August 7, 1966 at age 83. In 2009 the corner of West 135th Street and Lenox Avenue in New York was renamed Samuel J. Battle Plaza in honor of his achievements. That street corner marked the location where Battle saved a white officer’s life during a racial skirmish in 1919. #samueljbattle #blackpoliceofficer #nypd #newyork #harlem #harlemriots #samueljbattleplaza #Notsolongago #nsla - #regrann
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4 hours ago
Not so long ago: Samuel J. Battle was born Jan. 16, 1883 in New Bern, North Carolina. At the time he was recorded as the largest baby born in North Carolina at 16 pounds. Battle later grew to be 6’3’’ and over 280 pounds. When Battle was teenager, he was caught stealing money from a safe. His boss did not press charges but predicted Battle would be in prison within a year. Battle was determined to prove his boss wrong. He moved to New York City in 1901 and worked as a houseboy and red cap at the Sagamore Hotel. He decided to become a police officer since the job offered the stability he needed to support his young family. Battle became the first Black police officer in the New York Police Department. He ranked 119th out of 638 on his police test and officially joined the force June 1911 at the age of 28. Battle was initially assigned to the San Juan Hill neighborhood which was the heart of Black New York. With the great migration of the World War I period, he was reassigned to Harlem which became the center of Black life in the city. Battle became the first black sergeant, the first black lieutenant, and the first black parole commissioner. He endured discrimination and mistreatment while on the force from white civilians who traveled to Harlem to watch him work, as well as from white officers who refused to speak to him. However, some of the officers soon realized that Battle would be an asset in patrolling the Harlem community. In 1943 during the Harlem Riot, Battle was called by New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia to help defuse tensions in the community. Samuel Battle retired from the New York City Police Force in 1951 at 68. He was the highest-ranking Black officer on the force at that time. He died August 7, 1966 at age 83. In 2009 the corner of West 135th Street and Lenox Avenue in New York was renamed Samuel J. Battle Plaza in honor of his achievements. That street corner marked the location where Battle saved a white officer’s life during a racial skirmish in 1919. #samueljbattle #blackpoliceofficer #nypd #newyork #harlem #harlemriots #samueljbattleplaza #Notsolongago #nsla
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5 hours ago
#Repost @thedayafter2016 (@get_repost) ・・・ Not so long ago: Between 1940 and 1970 a mass migration brought thousands of Southern Black people to Chicago. Many settled in North Lawndale a middle class neighborhood on Chicago’s Westside. Federal policies known as redlining prevented Black families from getting real mortgages so they were forced to buy houses on contract from real estate speculators. The contracts were a scam. In 1968 the North Lawndale residents fought back with the help of community organizer Jack McNamara. McNamara discovered that the average overcharge was $10,000 per family. He also computed the monthly payments revealing that Blacks were paying a “race tax” of about $20,000 per family, a clear example of institutional racism. He later compiled data and estimated that more than $500 million ($3 Billion today) was legally stolen from Chicago's Black families between 1940 and 1970. With McNamara’s help, the people of North Lawndale organized the Contract Buyers League (CBL) and the Payment Strike of 1969 urging contract buyers to hold payments. By withholding payments the CBL was able to renegotiate, enabling the buyer to build equity and save on average $10,000 per contract. Mass evictions resulted. There were 552 families involved in the strike but after a long struggle it ended. Out of the 552 families only 106 successfully renegotiated their contracts while most lost and/or moved out of their homes. The CBL, hoping to set a nationwide precedent for fair housing, filed two federal lawsuits claiming discrimination; they lost both. Today North Lawndale is one of Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods with an unemployment rate over 18%; 42% of its residents live below the poverty line; and 1 in 5 homes is vacant. Fifty-one years ago Martin Luther King, Jr. moved into a dilapidated building in North Lawndale. Almost all the residents were impoverished and Black. Half a century later, they still are. #northlawndale #chicago #acaseforreparations #tanehisicoates #contractbuyersleague #cbl #redlining #racetax #paymentstrikeof1969 #jackmcnamara #martinlutherkingjr #notsolongago #nsla
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#Repost @thedayafter2016 (@get_repost) ・・・ Not so long ago: Born into slavery in Columbus County, North Carolina in 1851, Millie and Christine McCoy were the daughters of slaves owned by a blacksmith. Conjoined at birth, Millie and Christine were connected at the lower spine and shared one pelvis. At just 3-years-old, they became a featured attraction in P.T. Barnum’s American Museum in New York. A showman who worked there kidnapped them and shipped them to England where they toured between 1854 and 1855. While there, they were subjected to embarrassing public examinations in order to prove they were truly joined. This invasion of their privacy continued until they reached their teen years. By the time they were four, they had been stolen from their parents, kidnapped once and sold three times becoming lucrative earners for their succession of owners to exhibit in side-shows. Freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the girls remained with their last owner, J.P Smith, who had bought them for $30,000. Under his care and management they continued their career. Mrs. Smith taught them to read and write and honed their musical talents. They eventually became renowned performers touring the world as accomplished singers, pianists and even dancers. Fluent in five languages they danced and sang before the royal courts of Europe. They were a favorite of Queen Victoria. The twins soon earned enough money to support the rest of the family and for their father to purchase a farm. Returning to the States in 1882, they travelled with a circus for several years, receiving $25,000 a season, an extraordinary sum in those days. In 1884 they settled down in North Carolina, building a large house on the land they had bought for their father twenty years earlier. The twins succumbed to tuberculosis on October 8, 1912. Until their death they did charity work for Black schools and churches #millieandchristinemckoy #northcarolina #twins #cojoinedtwins #ptbarnum #Notsolongago #nsla
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1 day ago
Not so long ago: Joel A. Rogers was born Sept. 6, 1883 in Negril, Jamaica. He emigrated to the US in 1906, became a citizen, and settled in New York City. He held a variety of jobs including a Pullman porter, and a teacher, but eventually found his niche as a journalist and historian. He focused on combating white racist propaganda history in both books and popular films and other media that omitted persons of African ancestry as contributors to world history. In 1917 he published From Superman to Man. In this work a racist Southern senator, realizing finally that he was only a man, create a Hollywood film studio that would produce films that highlighted Africa's gifts to the world. Subsequent books also dealt with this theme including 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro, Sex and Race Volume 1-3, World’s Great Men of Color, and Africa’s Gifts to America. By the 1930s Rogers was writing history columns in a number of leading Black newspapers including the Pittsburgh Courier, Messenger, Crisis, Mercury, and the New York Amsterdam News. Typical of such articles was his 1940 piece in Crisis titled “The Suppression of Negro History.” Rogers was present at the inauguration of Emperor Haile Selassie in 1930 who presented him with the Coronation Medal. Five years later he covered the Italo-Ethiopian conflict as the first ever Black war correspondent. Although Rogers had no formal educational degrees or training, he was widely recognized for his professional excellence and intellect throughout his career. He belonged to the Paris France Society for Anthropology, American Geographical Society, and the Academy of Political Science. He was also multilingual, mastering German, Italian, French, and Spanish. Joel A. Rogers wrote anti-racist history using universal humanity as his theme until his death on March 26, 1966. His wife Helga Rogers continued to re-publish Rogers’ works for some years after his passing. #joelarogers #jamaica #negril #journalist #historian #multilingual #antiracist #ethiopia #emperorhaileselassie #notsolongago #nsla
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@Regranned from @thedayafter2016 - Not so long ago: Nova Scotia is considered the place of origin of modern ice hockey. The Colored Hockey League (CHL) of the Maritimes was formed in 1895 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. This first all-Black ice hockey league held over a dozen teams and employed over 400 African-Canadian players. The men were typically natives from the Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island areas. Comprised of the sons and grandsons of runaway enslaved Africans, the CHL helped pioneer the sport of ice hockey, changing the game from the primitive "gentleman's past-time" of the 19th century to the modern fast-paced moving game of today. In an era when many believed Blacks could not endure cold, possessed ankles too weak to effectively skate, and lacked the intelligence for organized sport, these men defied the established myths. Some of the innovations they contributed to the modern game included the "slap-shot" and the practice of goalies going down on the ice in order to stop the puck. The CHL would use the teachings of Booker T. Washington, the Bible, and speech resources from the Underground Railroad in their gamebooks and strategies. Despite their contributions to today's game of hockey, the CHL is not very well known. Herb Carnegie, a trailblazer in the CHL and one of the best to ever play, never played in the National Hockey League (NHL). Despite his tremendous skill he was denied a career because he was Black. After his hockey career, Carnegie started a hockey school called Future Aces and a foundation under the same name to help empower youth through athletics and academics. The contributions of the CHL and its players were ignored and/or stolen, as white teams and hockey officials copied elements of their style or sought to take self-credit for their innovations. Although the CHL continued to be prominent until the mid-1920s, racism, World War I, and dramatic changes in the Nova Scotian economy all played a part in the its demise. #icehockey #blackice #novascotia #nhl #coloredhockeyleague #herbcarnegie #futureaces #novascotia #notsolongago #nsla #educationforliberation
14
2 days ago
Not so long ago: Nova Scotia is considered the place of origin of modern ice hockey. The Colored Hockey League (CHL) of the Maritimes was formed in 1895 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. This first all-Black ice hockey league held over a dozen teams and employed over 400 African-Canadian players. The men were typically natives from the Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island areas. Comprised of the sons and grandsons of runaway enslaved Africans, the CHL helped pioneer the sport of ice hockey, changing the game from the primitive "gentleman's past-time" of the 19th century to the modern fast-paced moving game of today. In an era when many believed Blacks could not endure cold, possessed ankles too weak to effectively skate, and lacked the intelligence for organized sport, these men defied the established myths. Some of the innovations they contributed to the modern game included the "slap-shot" and the practice of goalies going down on the ice in order to stop the puck. The CHL would use the teachings of Booker T. Washington, the Bible, and speech resources from the Underground Railroad in their gamebooks and strategies. Despite their contributions to today's game of hockey, the CHL is not very well known. Herb Carnegie, a trailblazer in the CHL and one of the best to ever play, never played in the National Hockey League (NHL). Despite his tremendous skill he was denied a career because he was Black. After his hockey career, Carnegie started a hockey school called Future Aces and a foundation under the same name to help empower youth through athletics and academics. The contributions of the CHL and its players were ignored and/or stolen, as white teams and hockey officials copied elements of their style or sought to take self-credit for their innovations. Although the CHL continued to be prominent until the mid-1920s, racism, World War I, and dramatic changes in the Nova Scotian economy all played a part in the its demise. #icehockey #blackice #novascotia #nhl #coloredhockeyleague #herbcarnegie #futureaces #novascotia #notsolongago #nsla
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2 days ago
@Regranned from @thedayafter2016 - Not so long ago: At the turn of the 20th century, racial segregation laws were denying Blacks access to public facilities across the South. The earliest public libraries in southern states excluded Blacks by law. When Andrew Carnegie funded the construction of a new public library in Atlanta in 1902, W. E. B. DuBois spoke out against the injustice of a public facility that refused service to a third of Atlanta’s population. The Louisville Western Branch Library, also known as Louisville Free Public Library, Western Colored Branch, opened in 1905 in Louisville, Kentucky. It took its place in history as the first in the nation to provide library services exclusively for Blacks using only Black staff. Its plan called for the establishment of a branch library for its "colored" citizens. It was funded by Andrew Carnegie. Until the building could be completed, the city rented 3 rooms of a private residence in one of Louisville's predominantly Black neighborhoods. Above the door a sign read, "Knowledge is power." Reverend Thomas Fountain Blue, educated as a theologian, was chosen branch librarian. The nation's first Black person to head a public library, he created a high quality operation. The library fostered a feeling of perfect welcome, pride in ownership and unqualified privilege. Blue's work began focusing on children and developing an expanding pool of young readers. He organized a Children's Department supervised by Mrs. Rachel D. Harris. Together they developed special entertainments, story hours, and debate and reading clubs which proved to be successful and meaningful experiences. Blue and his team built an extensive collection of Black history, literature and significant writings. Of note, in 2001 the Prince donated $12,000 to the library for community building services. #library #louisvillewesternbranchlibrary #louisville #kentucky #thomasfountainblue #publiclibrary #andrewcarnegie #webdubois #prince #notsolongago #nsla #educationforliberation
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3 days ago
Not so long ago: At the turn of the 20th century, racial segregation laws were denying Blacks access to public facilities across the South. The earliest public libraries in southern states excluded Blacks by law. When Andrew Carnegie funded the construction of a new public library in Atlanta in 1902, W. E. B. DuBois spoke out against the injustice of a public facility that refused service to a third of Atlanta’s population. The Louisville Western Branch Library, also known as Louisville Free Public Library, Western Colored Branch, opened in 1905 in Louisville, Kentucky. It took its place in history as the first in the nation to provide library services exclusively for Blacks using only Black staff. Its plan called for the establishment of a branch library for its "colored" citizens. It was funded by Andrew Carnegie. Until the building could be completed, the city rented 3 rooms of a private residence in one of Louisville's predominantly Black neighborhoods. Above the door a sign read, "Knowledge is power." Reverend Thomas Fountain Blue, educated as a theologian, was chosen branch librarian. The nation's first Black person to head a public library, he created a high quality operation. The library fostered a feeling of perfect welcome, pride in ownership and unqualified privilege. Blue's work began focusing on children and developing an expanding pool of young readers. He organized a Children's Department supervised by Mrs. Rachel D. Harris. Together they developed special entertainments, story hours, and debate and reading clubs which proved to be successful and meaningful experiences. Blue and his team built an extensive collection of Black history, literature and significant writings. Of note, in 2001 the Prince donated $12,000 to the library for community building services. #library #louisvillewesternbranchlibrary #louisville #kentucky #thomasfountainblue #publiclibrary #andrewcarnegie #webdubois #prince #notsolongago #nsla
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3 days ago
Not so long ago: Jesse Blayton was born in Fallis, Oklahoma Dec. 6, 1879. He graduated from the University of Chicago Illinois in 1922 and then moved to Atlanta, Georgia to establish a private practice as an accountant. He was the state's first Black Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and only the fourth Black person nationwide to hold the certification. He taught accounting at Atlanta University where he encouraged younger Black students to enter the profession. He had little success. A decade after Blayton became a CPA there were only 7 other Blacks in the US who had achieved that status. In 1949 Blayton made history when he bought Atlanta radio station WERD for $50,000. Blayton directed the format toward the local Black audience. WERD was a pioneer in programming what he called "Negro appeal" music, playing early versions of R&B that could not be found elsewhere on the air. Although WDIA, established in Memphis,Tennessee in 1948, played music oriented for Black audiences, WERD was the only Black-owned station to do so at that time. By 1954 there were approximately 200 Black-oriented radio stations but fewer than a dozen were Black-owned. Blayton hired his son, Jesse,Jr., as the station's first program director who hired 4 Black announcers including "Jockey" Jack Gibson who by the early 1950s became one of Atlanta's most popular radio personalities. Gibson read daily news that was relevant to the Black community and conducted on-air interviews of Atlanta University professors and prominent Black leaders. WERD diverged from other local radio stations by publicizing the civil rights movement. The station was located in the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge Building, which also housed the headquarters of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., President of SCLC, often walked upstairs to the WERD studio to make public statements about the organization's activities. Jesse Blayton, Sr. sold WERD in 1968 upon his retirement. He died on Sept. 7, 1977 in Atlanta. In 1995 he was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame. #jesseblayton #accountant #atlanta #georgia #sclc #mlk #werd #radiostation #blackowned #notsolongago #nsla
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4 days ago
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